News Archive 2013

Improving Access for River Users

River Annan Trust - April 2013

 

A partnership between the River Annan Trust and the Apex Trust is providing better access to the river bank for anglers and walkers by building styles, benches, bridges and improving access paths. Apex Trust provides work based volunteer opportunities for ex-offenders and at risk adults to build practical skills, soft skills and boost confidence to improve their chances of employment which in turn facilitates behavioural change. Apex have been helping ex-offenders for 25 years working with a variety of organisations on a number of different projects. This provides volunteers with opportunities to learn a number of different skills and receive training such as the safe use of pesticides and the maintenance and use of a brushcutter.


Since June 2012 the project has improved access to most of the upper Annan for anglers, dog walkers and members of the public to enjoy the River Annan and its wildlife. So far the River Annan Trust has received positive feedback from river users and landowners as visitors to the river no longer have to scramble over fences to get access.

Youcan read more about the progress of this work on the project page by clicking here.

Access on the River Annan
Voluneer Invertebrate Sampling
Riverfly Monitoring project

River Annan Trust - April 2013


In July 2012 seventeen River Annan Trust volunteers attended the River Monitoring Initiative (RMI) run by the Riverfly Partnership. The initiative was set up to train anglers and river users to help monitor the biological water quality of their local water course. Although the volunteers come from a variety of backgrounds they all have one common interest, helping to ensure that the smaller watercourses within the catchment are clean and have healthy populations of invertebrates. They do this through a simple scoring system that can be used as an indicator of pollution as the absence of key species is likely to have a direct link to either an on-going pollution incident or a flash pollution incident.

The Riverfly Partnership is a network of nearly 100 partner organisations, representing anglers, conservationists, entomologists, scientists, water course managers and relevant authorities, working together to:


• Protect the water quality of our rivers
• Further the understanding of riverfly populations
• Actively conserve riverfly habitats.

Invertebrate Sampling
Get Hooked on Fishing

River Annan Trust - April 2013

 

On a very wet and windy day in November a group of children from St Mungo’s school attended a fishing day on the lakes at Kinmount estate as part of a project called Get Hooked on Fishing. The project isn’t just to help recruit a new generation of angler it also helps to give the children an opportunity to get outdoors and learn more about the environment in which we live. The day included invertebrate studies with the help of Jim Rae from Lockerbie Wildlife Group which involved taking live samples from the lake giving the kids an opportunity to see the aquatic life up close. This was followed by a few hours fishing for pike in the lake assisted by angling coaches from Borderline which is a non-profit making company that aims to help children through angling. The coaches for the day were Glyn Freeman and Clive Mitchelhill who are both AAPGAI instructors and Chris Bowman who is an angling coach with the Professional Anglers Association, they were assisted by volunteers from the River Annan Trust.


Despite the weather being as poor as could possibly be all off the children thoroughly enjoyed the day which due to the weather, unfortunately had to be cut short. Spirits were however lifted when through a combined effort the first pike of the day was hooked and landed weighing a massive 6lbs, this was quickly followed by another two smaller fish before the decision was made to end the day on a high and take a group of very wet children to find shelter for their lunch before returning to the school.

River Annan Fishing for kids
River Annan Fishing for kids
Juniors & Ladies Fishing Day

River Annan Trust - April 2013

 

During the summer the River Annan Trust, in conjunction with Anne Woodcock from FishPal, will be running a series of salmon fishing introduction days for women and junior trout days on the Hoddom Beat on the River Annan. The days are open to anglers of all abilities from beginners to advanced. All money raised from both events will be donated to the River Annan Trust.

The ladies fishing days will be primarily for salmon fishing and will act as an introduction to fishing. The introduction to salmon fishing workshop for beginners covers rod assembly, lines and fly choice, wading with safety in mind and casting tuition including fishing the beats classic fly water. Ladies who have fished before will join River Annan Trust members and the ghillie of the Hoddom beat who will explain the beat hot spots, terrain, where to cast the fly, including water craft. Coaches will provide tuition to improve your casting if required.

The junior trout days qualified coaches will take you step by step teaching you everything you need to know to be able to have an enjoyable day's trout fishing, including casting tuition, types and styles of fishing to water craft and safety. This event is for beginners to experienced junior anglers and equipment is included, if required.
Anne Woodcock will be assisted by angling instructor Paul Little, AAPGAI Master in the double handed rod and GAIA instructor Cliff Johnston as well as coaches from the North East Ladies Fishing Club. All instructors are UKCC Level 2 qualified, first aid trained, insured and CRB checked.  Ladies Fishing would like to stress all juniors must wear a life vest. Life jackets will be available on the day.


For more information contact Anne Woodcock on 01573 470612 or anne.woodcock@fishpal.com and The River Annan Trust on 01576 470600.

For more information on the ladies day click here

For more information on the juniors day click here

River Annan Juniors fishing day
River Annan Ladies fishing day
Annan Trout Sampling Days

River Annan Trust - May 2013

 

Over the course of the winter the River Annan Trust has been running a series of grayling days which have been open to all anglers of all abilities. So far they have been very popular and successful with plenty of grayling being caught up to 3lb in weight as well as some of the very large Annan trout. During the first five months of the trout season there will be a five trout days held on a number of beats on the Annan.


These days give regular and visiting anglers the opportunity to fish on rarely fished beats on the lower Annan for brown trout averaging 2lb 8oz which are often caught in excess of 5lb as well as some of the more well-known trout beats further up the river where due to several years of catch and release the trout numbers are at an all-time high. As with the grayling days the trout days are open to all anglers of all abilities.


Information on the Annan trout population will be gathered during these days from the fish caught an anglers will be expected to measure the length and weight of all fish caught and record the information on a returns card, scale samples will also need to be taken from all fish over a certain size. This sort of data collection is very useful to help monitor the Annan trout population.

To find out more about Trout Sampling Days click here

River Annan Trout Fishing
Invasive Species Alert: American Skunk Cabbage (Lysichiton americanus)

River Annan Trust - May 2013

A small patch American Skunk Cabbage has recently been identified on the Water of Ae within the River Annan Catchment. This is an invasive non-native species from North America and can be found around ponds and ditches but will grow in any damp areas. In early spring it can bear a resemblance to lords & ladies or cuckoo pint (Arum maculatum) as it is also know. However it can eventually grow to be 1.5 metres in height producing green berries in the summer. The plant produces seeds which may be dispersed via the river. It can also reproduce from small fragments of rhizome or stem. American skunk cabbage is so called as it emits a pungent smell (similar to a skunk apparently) to attract insects as pollinators.


Why is it a problem? Like most non-native plants it does not have any natural enemies to keep it in check. It is capable of forming dense stands and shading out native vegetation and clogging up ponds and ditches.


Identification of American skunk cabbage is relatively straight forward between March and May as it produces large yellow flowers. At other times look for the large cabbage like leaves.

Report American Skunk Cabbage to: invasives@annanfisheryboard.co.uk

For more information visit our ID and information page


 

 

River Annan Trout Fishing
Recent Fish Mortalities

River Annan Trust - May 2013

Late on Sunday the Fishery Board was notified of a number of dead and moribund (near death) fish in the river between Williamwath Bridge and Warmanbie. It is difficult to determine the number of fish as some may have been seen by more than one person but it is thought to be between 5 and 6 (2 dead and 3 or 4 moribund) salmon and a couple of trout. By the time the Head Water bailiff got the message it was too dark to see adequately and remove the fish. One moribund trout was removed by the ghillie on the Hoddom fishery and killed.


 

 

Over the last few decades seeing this number of dead fish in the river has been very unusual and inevitably anglers who remember the outbreaks of UDN in the 60s and 70s are very concerned, particularly as UDN was identified in a number of rivers in Scotland last year such as the Spey. The cause of these mortalities in the river is not known and it may be UDN but that does not mean that we have to panic. UDN is a disease that fish come in from the sea with but in most cases it clears up and there is no evidence of it. Some of the fish reported were brown trout and as they have never been to sea it is highly unlikely to have been UDN in their case. UDN has not gone away since the 60s and 70s nor was it novel disease that had never occurred in salmon. The reason fish die is due to a secondary infection of saprolegnia (fungus). Saprolegnia in our rivers is a cold water problem and once the temperature is much over 10°C it does not thrive. The spores of saprolegnia are always present in the water and they attach themselves to any areas of necrotic (dead) tissue on the fish. UDN causes small lesions of necrotic tissue, mainly around the head, which is why the saprolegnia infection is typically around the head of fish during a UDN case.


 

 

Whilst we do not wish there to be any panic we do want to try and understand what is going on and need help from all river users. We have now got sampling kits from Marine Scotland and we are equipped to take the required samples. The one important issue to note though is that once the fish dies the use of any samples reduces rapidly indeed after 30minutes or so it is doubtful whether it is worth taking any samples at all. As with the best will in the world it is unlikely that we would be able to attend within that time frame please do not kill any fish you either see or catch that are showing signs of infection. What we would like people to do is contact the Fishery Board straight away on 01576 470600 or 07710331079 if they see or catch a fish that is behaving unnaturally and appears stressed.  If the fish has been caught retain it in the water, alive, in a landing net. If a fish is seen in the water do not attempt to catch it but contact ourselves where we can use electrofishing equipment to attempt capture. If at all possible stay with the fish until we arrive and try and leave it undisturbed, if it panics and moves off it is going to be very difficult to find.

 

The trout removed from Hoddom Fishery on Sunday

Above: Looking for dead or moribund fish and right: one of the affected fish spotted on Sunday evening

 

More information about UDN can be found by clicking on the links the links below. We would like to reiterate that we have not found UDN but want to find out more information about what is going on whilst providing as much information as possible about what we find.

For more information about UDN visit our information page.

To report fish with signs of an infection please call 01576 47060 or 0771331079 or 07872128739

Trout Sampling
River Watch on Poachers

31 May 2013

The River Annan & District Salmon Fishery Board has developed a partnership approach with Police Scotland to crack down on illegal poaching. The partnership will see stake outs conducted on the river from its source in upper Annandale down to the Solway in a bid to deter the illegal practice.

You can read the article by clicking here.

 


 

Otter Showing Anglers how its done!

03 June 2013

The River Annan has always has a healthy Otter population and sightings of them are not rare, however watching an otter looking for fish in broad daylight is not always so common as they can quickly disappear once they have detected the presence of people. This particular otter didn’t seem to mind the audience as it made its way down a small burn looking for a snack.

For more information about otters click here


 

Tide Lines Article - Volunteering on the Annan 

24 May 2013

 

The spring/summer issue of Tidelines magazine produced by the Solway Firth Partnership includes an article about the River Annan and the great work volunteers do to help improve the river. The River Annan Trust has been building a volunteer base over the past few years and you can find out more on page 13 of the magazine.


 

Click here to download Tide Lines newsletter

Find out more about the Solway Firth Partnership

Trout Sampling
Juniors & Ladies Fishing Day

River Annan Trust - May 2013

 

During the summer the River Annan Trust, in conjunction with Anne Woodcock from FishPal, will be running a series of salmon fishing introduction days for women and junior trout days on the Hoddom Beat on the River Annan. The days are open to anglers of all abilities from beginners to advanced. All money raised from both events will be donated to the River Annan Trust.

The ladies fishing days will be primarily for salmon fishing and will act as an introduction to fishing. The introduction to salmon fishing workshop for beginners covers rod assembly, lines and fly choice, wading with safety in mind and casting tuition including fishing the beats classic fly water. Ladies who have fished before will join River Annan Trust members and the ghillie of the Hoddom beat who will explain the beat hot spots, terrain, where to cast the fly, including water craft. Coaches will provide tuition to improve your casting if required.

The junior trout days qualified coaches will take you step by step teaching you everything you need to know to be able to have an enjoyable day's trout fishing, including casting tuition, types and styles of fishing to water craft and safety. This event is for beginners to experienced junior anglers and equipment is included, if required.
Anne Woodcock will be assisted by angling instructor Paul Little, AAPGAI Master in the double handed rod and GAIA instructor Cliff Johnston as well as coaches from the North East Ladies Fishing Club. All instructors are UKCC Level 2 qualified, first aid trained, insured and CRB checked.  Ladies Fishing would like to stress all juniors must wear a life vest. Life jackets will be available on the day.


For more information contact Anne Woodcock on 01573 470612 or anne.woodcock@fishpal.com and The River Annan Trust on 01576 470600.

For more information on the ladies day click here

For more information on the juniors day click here

River Annan Juniors fishing day
River Annan Ladies fishing day
Paralympic Dream for Young Local Angler

14 June 2013

Local girl and keen Annan angler Shelby Watson has a dream to become a professional athlete and represent Scotland at the next commonwealth games and also the next Paralympics in Rio as a speed racer. Shelby has cerebral palsy and is currently fundraising to raise the money needed to purchase a specialised wheel chair to compete in the games. Shelby’s inspiration is British Paralympian Shelly Woods, who won a silver medal in the women’s marathon during the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London and one day she hopes to win herself a place on the podium.

Shelby has a long history of fundraising for charity despite being only 15 and she now attends Moffat Academy. Shelby will be at the forthcoming River Annan Trust junior days being held each month from June to August.

For more information on the junior days click here


For more information on Shelby Watsons story visit www.shelby-watson-moffat.co.uk


 

Salmon in the Classroom – Brydekirk Primary School

02 July 2013

This year the Trust has been working with the kids at Brydekirk Primary School with the Salmon in the Classroom Project. The kids got a lot out of it and have a good understanding of the freshwater environment and how important it is. The Salmon in the Classroom Project was developed by Galloway Fisheries Trust in the late 90s and has been used and adapted by River Trusts throughout the UK.  Here on the Annan we have been working with at least one school per year since then.

The project is spread over two terms and is a mixture of classroom based work and field work. In the classroom they get given a tank, a pump, a filter and about 100 eggs. The children then have to act as surrogates for Mother Nature and keep everything as it would be in the wild to ensure the fish hatch and can be released in the river. The field work involves electrofishing and bug hunting. This is always carried out towards the end of the summer term and is a good excuse for sending kids back to their parents wet and dirty!

The best schools involve everything they do in the classroom with the project. They can do science reports, mathematics, essays and art work and all manner of activities related to the project. Brydekirk however are the first to produce this pretty cool animation, all the work of Duncan, aged 10. Sit back and enjoy.


 

European Bullheads found in the Kirtle Water

08 July 2013

In a recent electrofishing survey on the Kirtle Water, a small river that enters the Solway between Annan and Gretna, we found four European bullheads (Cottus gobio). These fish are also known by other names, such as millers thumb and sculpin. There were two previous reports in small sections of the Annan catchment a number of years ago but we have never found them again. This led us to conclude that pollution in the burn in which these records had been made had led to their extinction there.

 

The River Annan Trust is particularly interested in this finding as, to our knowledge, they have never before been reported in the Kirtle Water. The Jury is out on what this means. Bullheads, outside of their native range are often invasive. In their native range they are regarded as important species which indicate a healthy naturalness of a river. Bullheads are native to other rivers within the Solway area, such as the rivers Eden and Border Esk. Bullhead are listed on Annex II of the Habitats Directive and they are a qualifying species for the Eden Special Area of Conservation (SAC). This freshwater species is not known for making significant migrations; however published information from Scandinavia suggests that some movement in brackish water may be possible. If this is the case, then it is possible that they may have arrived through natural means from either the river Eden or the river Esk via the Solway to the Lower Kirtle. If this is the case this record could represent Scotland’s first native Bullhead population. Clearly more research would be required to confirm this. If they have been introduced by other means, then this unlicensed introduction constitutes an illegal act and may have long-term ecological consequences.

 

We would urge all anglers and other river users to keep an eye out for these fish so we can map their distribution. Bullheads, if they are present in numbers, will soon show themselves. They can be fairly cryptic and are found in the underside of stones and cobbles. Please e-mail us with any information you find.

Annan Fishery owner and Member of the Board Becomes Chairman of Fulling Mill

13 July 2013

Annan Fishery owner, member of the Board and Treasurer of the River Annan Trust has just become Chairman of Fulling Mill, probably the makers of the world's best flies and a whole host of other important tackle items. I reckon it is time we raided our fly boxes and gave him an Annan selection of flies to be tied by his team. Watch this space! Read the press release.

 

For further information about Fulling Mill, including the Company’s product selection, history, opportunities, and plans for the future, please visit their web site by clicking on the logo.

 

 

Are these the first native Scottish Bullheads to be found or are they a problem invasive?

An eel caught during the Brydekirk Primary School field trip in late June

River Annan Trust and Kate's Kitchen Battle Invasive Plant

05 August 2013

It’s that time of year again when Himalayan balsam is out in full force and this year we have been joined in the fight against this alien invader by Kate’s Kitchen based in Annan.

 

Himalayan balsam is the tallest annual plant in the UK and due to its ability to spread rapidly, particularly along water courses, it quickly out competes native plants, shading them out and forming a dense monoculture. This reduced biodiversity has a knock on effect on the species that rely on the usual mix of our native plants and flowers.

 

Control work was carried out on a large stand of Himalayan balsam on the Water of Ae (a significant tributary of the of the Kinnel) and as the Kinnel and Water of Ae are largely free from invasion it was important that we attempt to tackle this stand as soon as possible.

 

Kate’s kitchen provided 4 volunteers and a supervisor as we set about pulling up the plant. Being an annual the main aim of our control work is to prevent it seeding and this is done by pulling the plant up by the roots. Despite the usual battle scars inflicted by tackling balsam such as stings, bites and scratches the guys worked well and we managed to remove a significant patch of balsam from a natural spring that runs into the Water of Ae.

 

Kate’s kitchen is a charitable organisation that offers a welcoming environment while providing hot meals for vulnerable adults and those on a low income. They also provide a number of volunteer opportunities for people to develop skills and improve their confidence while benefitting the local community.

 

 

Above - Before and after picture of the area

 

Furthest Right - Kate's kitchen volunters stand proudly over the defeated balsam

 

Right - The team enjoy a hard earned lunch break

  • Find out more about Himalayan balsam on the Annan here

 

  • For more information on Himalayan balsam click here

 

  • Find out more about Kate's Kitchen here

 

 

Its Showtime

06 August 2013

The River Annan Trust and The River Annan District Salmon Fishery Board have a busy few weeks ahead meeting the public. Last weekend we were at the Dumfries and Lockerbie show, next weekend we will be at the Lowther Game Fair (10th and 11th) and on the weekend of the 17th and 18th we will be at the Galloway Country Fair at Drumlanrig Castle. We will be explaining what we do, why we do it and running some practical demonstrations on how rivers work. We hope to see as many of you as possible on what are good days out for the whole family.

 

Shows and dates:

 

  • The Dumfries & Lockerbie Agricultural Show: Saturday 3rd August (9:00 - 17:00)

 

  • The Lowther Game Fair: 10th & 11th August (8:30 - 18:00)

 

  • The Galloway Country Fair: 17th & 18th August (9:00 - 17:00)

Above - Future river managers at the Dumfries & Lockerbie show

New Fish Pass on Duff Kinnel

30 September 2013

In about 1820 Raehills Estate built a weir to provide water for the ornamental lake in front of the house. Unfortunately it subsequently barred access to this water course, with about 20mile of spawning and nursery habitat, to migratory salmonids. In about 2002 the Fishery Board tried a cheap fix with some boarding but this was only partially successful. Salmon and sea trout managed to ascend on some occasions and young fish were found upstream in small numbers. In many other years though migration failed and we once again lost production from this part of the catchment. The good news is that a purpose built Alaskan A fish pass has now been installed on the weir and fish can once again use their ancestral spawning locations, barred to them since 1820. The fish pass was designed by Fishway Engineering from data supplied by the River Annan DSFB.  There will no doubt be a few salmon above it in the future but we except the biggest beneficiary from this project will be sea trout which already spawn in close proximity to this area. In times of low sea trout returns this type of project is incredibly important.

 

We are indebted to Raehills Estate for the construction of this which they fully financed out of their own resources. The Board and Trust will be carrying out regular surveys of the fish numbers in this area and report back in due course.

Report on the Responses to Sea Trout Regulations Consultation

28 October 2013

 

The consultation was designed to gather feedback from as wide a variety of fishery user group as possible. The bare minimum standard expected by the legislation would have been to advertise our intentions in the local press on two occasions and publish a report explaining why we felt we needed the order. We published on the river website, www.riverannan.org, and carried out the press adverts in the Annandale Observer but also chose to make the consultation far more public so as many people as possible could get a chance to respond. To achieve this we carried out a number of other exercises:

1. We have held a public consultation event in the middle of Lockerbie where people could drop in, look at the evidence, talk to Board members and staff and make written submissions there and then;

 

2. We attended an EGM of the Upper Annandale Angling Association where this subject was the sole agenda item;

3. All proprietors on the River Annan DSFB valuation roll were notified;

4. We notified as many of the anglers as we could by e-mail with the help of FishPal who do most of the online bookings on the river. Just short of 800 e-mails were sent, on our behalf, by FishPal; and

5. We posted links to the consultation page on website forums used by many anglers.

 

When the consultation closed on the 4th of October we had 70 responses from a variety of sources (proprietors, anglers and NGOs). Some responses came in late and are also being considered. The responses vary from very short comments along the lines of I agree or I disagree through to detailed responses outlining why it is a good idea or why (others feel) it is not a good idea. There have been common themes as well which people on both sides of the debate make reference to. The vast majority have been in favour of this move but the Board should not ignore the response against as there are suggestions which should be considered.

 

Read the report here.

For information on how the Annan is fishing visit the Fishannan reports page click here 


For information on river levels click here


For our river webcam click here 

 

For further information on all the fishing on the river visit the River Annan website

 

Contact Us

 

Fisheries Office
Annandale Estates, St Ann's
Lockerbie
Tel: 01576 470600

Mobile: 07710331079
Email: 

nick@annanfisheryboard.co.uk

River Annan News

 

Get your copy of the Fisherman's Guide to the River Annan

 

 

 

River Annan Winter Grayling Events

05 November 2013

 

Every year the River Annan Trust organises a number of winter grayling fishing events to find out more about the status of stocks of these fish in the river, and other stocks of fish caught by accident by anglers fishing for grayling. The event's have proved popular with a number of anglers and we are now getting some good data which will be useful for showing long term trends in populations and highlight problems we should be aware of. As an angler you will get opportunities to fish sections of the river that you may never have fished before and the chance to meet lots of like minded people who share a
common passion.

 

Dates for the 2013-2014 Winter

 

 

  • Saturday 7th December

  • Sunday 5th January

  • Sunday 26th January

  • Saturday 23rd February

  • Sunday 16th March

 

Meet: Café 91 on Lockerbie High Street at 8:30 am to be allotted a fishery and take part.

Need directions? Click here

Cost: £10 donation to River Annan Trust.


For more information contact Nick or Michael on 01576 470600 or 07710 331079

or email at nick@annanfisheryboard.co.uk or michael@annanfisheryboard.co.uk

 

You can download the information poster here

 

The Good Old Days

12 November 2011

 

Almost every angler on the river harks back to the ‘good old days’, a time when it would seem salmon and trout were so prolific that you could walk over their backs in every pool on the river. Whilst there it is in no doubt that fish abundance has been greater in the past we should not kid ourselves that everything was rosy in days gone by. Whilst looking for some historical documents earlier this week we chanced upon this report from 1897. It would appear that a weir on the lower river at Brydekirk was causing extreme problems for the river. In that year 103 fish were caught by just three anglers at an average weight of just under 20lbs but upstream of the weir on the 25 miles of water between Brydekirk and Moffat only a further 82 fish were caught and reports from keepers and anglers were dire.

 

Thankfully this weir has long ago fallen into disrepair and fish pass it without even pausing for breath. We should not kid ourselves though that the good old days were necessarily good for salmon, we have seen angler diaries from the 1930s which showed that the Annan was a river in trouble. There were a number of very large fish about, fish over 30lb seemed relatively common and fish over 50lb were recorded, the absolute numbers of fish were significantly less than we get today. It would appear that until all of the weirs on the river fell into disrepair that the chances of catching fish on the river were pretty slim in many years.

 

To read the full report click on the image below.

 

Fishy goings on near Lockerbie

08 November 2013

 

A report was in the local paper about a haul of 40 dead salmon found in a lay-by near Lockerbie. All the fish were 4-5kgs in weight. Unfortunately the council workers who found the fish did the obvious thing and phoned the press instead of the police or DSFB. No danger to Sherlock Holmes from this bunch. The first the Board knew about it was the report in the press and it was clearly worrying.

 

A rumour has since spread out across the whole river that we had been subjected to a serious poaching incident. Our head bailiff started investigating the incident as soon as we were made aware of the incident and earlier today found that one carcass had been left behind in the clean up. The fish left behind was clearly a farmed fish, significant fin erosion on the tail in particular is a pretty dead cert give away.

 

It would appear that someone, for reasons best known to themselves, has had a load of farmed fish that have gone past there sell by date and then dumped them. It would however be good if these reports were made to the DSFB or Police before the press as a great deal of work has had to be carried out today by two members of staff tracing what had happened.

 

 

Top - The fish found at the side the side of the road and

below the tail showing considerable fin erosion - a clear indication of a farmed fish

Left - The dumped farmed fish found by DGFirst

 

RAFTS Policy Statement on the Stocking of Atlantic Slamon

31 October 2013

 

RAFTS have produced a policy statement on the stocking of Atlantic Salmon. The policy statement suggests that there should be a general presumption the against artificial introduction of salmon and sea trout for fishery enhancement purposes. The statement highlights the growing body of scientific evidence, both national and international that confirms that enhancement stocking is largely ineffective and potentially harmful.

 

You can read the policy statement in full here.